Staley Street

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staley street

Postby georgewiliam » Wed Feb 13, 2008 5:17 pm

Ok Lily---Washing and washday memories------Bagwash---we used to take a job lot of dirty clothes carried in a pillow-case to the ’laundry’. This was to a house on Monfa Road where the bags were collected by a van and trundled off to Ford Convent Laundry. The pillow slips were returned with their washed, damp and un-ironed contents for collection to be ironed and aired at home. Invariably, items were missing, or items belonging to someone else were in the bag---always gave rise to negotiations.
When the washing was done at home, the gas boiler was cranked up for a white boiling wash. The clothes, when deemed done, were lifted into a great bowl of fresh rinsing water by means of big wooden tongs. In the winter, clouds of steam were generated which condensed on any cool surface so that in the end, everything was swimming----it was horrible. More dunking and hand-wringing in fresh rinse water into which a Reckitts Blue had been added. The ‘blue’ imparted a very faint colouring which made the whites look whiter-----after that----the mangle. As I remember, coloureds were ‘done’ in a separate wash tub: Mum thumped and bashed the clothes by hand, the woman next door used a dolly-peg. Others used a washboard but I do not remember there being much evidence of these in our street. In truth, I never saw such until I was in the Air Force when we formed a skiffle group where it became a ‘musical instrument‘.
Clothes were aired on the let-down rack in the back room and the outside line and pulley mentioned in earlier posts. In addition, clothes were aired on the big fireguard or a small line strung under the mantle-piece. It’s no wonder that small house fires were fairly common. Oddly enough, we never owned a clothes maiden.
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Staley Street

Postby georgewiliam » Sat Feb 16, 2008 12:38 pm

Who remembers the police call-box at the top of the street, on the corner by the estate yard (Griff William's den). It was not unlike the one used by the cartoon character 'Top Cat' and officer Dibble.
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Postby lily8 » Mon Feb 18, 2008 6:46 am

Thanks again Georgewilliam for the memories dont know youre age but did you live through the war years and if so let us know what it was`like ie the food rationing etc,
all best
Lily
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Staley Street

Postby georgewiliam » Tue Feb 19, 2008 8:07 pm

Lily----a few quick tales on some of the lighter aspects of wartime. As I mentioned in an earlier post, my Dad was an officer in the Home Guard, ok he was non-commissioned that is he was a lance corporal in charge of the bike squad. As time went by, his men were callled up, one by one until the only thing he was left in charge of was his own push-bike. On duty one night with muck and bullets, fire and bombs all over the shop, he spotted an object floating down from the heavens. For a while, the artist in him admired the surrealim of it all as the fires illuminated a gently swinging cylinder beneath a shot-silk canopy. His muse was cut short as he realised he was actually looking at a parachuting landmine so he took off for the nearest street shelter which happened to be in our street. As he galloped around the corner by the Estate Yard, 3 men asked what his hurry was---he told them that a landmine was on its way down in Annie Road. Hoho they said---pull the other one. As Dad made it to the shelter there was an enormous explosion-------within 30 milliseconds, the 3 chaps he had just spoken to were fighting each other to get into the narrow doorway of the shelter---he said it was like watching the '3 Stooges' as they spent most of the time making all sorts of squirming movements as they were mutually jammed in the doorway.

Two further stories repeatd here from a post on the 'Looking for old friends'
My old Dad was making his way home in a complete blackout on one occassion. Feeling his way with arms outstretched, he tripped over a kerb and fell full tilt forward. Unfortunately the grand wheeze of using outsretched hands to feel his way failed as they neatly passed either side of a cast-iron fire hydrant. By using his face, he cleverly managed to break his fall ---------he thought that he had died as his head exploded in a burst of stars and pain. Whilst not amusing at the time, he used to laugh at this episode in later years.
Another tale told to my Mum by a work friend concerned the friend's father who was busily engaged on the outside privy when the air raid siren went off. He pulled up his pants and with braces dragging behind charged through the house with the rest of the family all making their way to the street shelter. As he traversed the front door-step, Mum's friend stood on his dangling braces---he kept going---the braces stretched----she took her next step----the braces like an elastic band, thwacked him in the middle of his back. Dad collapses in the street screaming that the b*****ds had got him------it took him a long time to live that down
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Staley Street

Postby Bob Greenhalgh » Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:26 pm

Thought I'd add a little to this thread.
My family 'The Greenhalgh's' lived at 608a Hawthorne Road. We lived over/behind the Ribble Motor Services Booking offices (later to be sold to a firm of printers and subequently to Wirral Tool Hire). My Mam and Dad-Winnie and Tom, children-Gerry, Valerie, Ted, Dorothy, David, Robert and Barbara - the youngest. At 606 were the Lappin's and at 604 the Beaumont's -the only family to have a phone. Over the wall from us was the 'Mailie' with its huge mountain of mail sacks. Businesses- Farrell's, Melanear ?, Lead Works, Rubber Works, Tannery, Cambell and Isherwood. Vernon's Pools on Linacre Lane/Hawthorne Road with its illuminated/ moving sign of somebody posting a letter!
I remember Greens at 56 (the first family in the street to have TV) Fosters at 44, Loughlins at 32, Rosettes at 28, Cousins at 30, Roaches, Whitings, Joneses, Luptons at 3, Glews at 6, Croziers at 1, Maggie Ramsay 11?, Mr and Mrs Dobson at 10, Clara and Joyce Williams at 5, Mr and Joyce Jones at 4, Mr and Mrs Webb at 2. George Baxendale at 40? Georgie Revell at 48? Edwards at 27? Mrs and Dezzy Gaynor at 39. I'm sure other names will come to me! Shops- Cullen's, Robert's, Ashcroft's, Charlie Clarke's, Williams' Rent Office, Scott's, Whipp's, Parkin and Purslow (great for spitfires), Blakeman's, Vass's, Thelwell's, Dorothy Turner's, Spencely's, Vass's 2nd shop?, White's and Irwin's. The local phonebox was at the top of the street on Monfa Road. The number used to be B00(922) 4246. Press Button A! Cost? 4d.
Ah well.
:)
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Postby ron waters » Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:32 pm

BOB Are you any relation to Leslie Welsh , the Memory Man .
Ron
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Postby Bob Greenhalgh » Tue Feb 26, 2008 10:09 am

Good morning Ron,
No relation. Didn't have any relatives locally -neither of my parents were from Liverpool.
Bob
:)
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Postby whacker66 » Tue Feb 26, 2008 11:35 am

Hi bob,
when you mentioned the shops in your thread...Blakemans was my dads aunty (lizzy) and her son david...was the shop called 'bobbys' the cleaners and alterations?
Peter
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Postby margaret willee » Tue Feb 26, 2008 11:38 am

Georgewilliam .... you sound like my husband he keeps everything ... as soon as some thing breaks he's off down to the cellar and sure enough he has an extra ...
love all your stories , as frank says it all comes back , still think it was the best time off my life ...
margaret
have a great day .......
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Staley Street

Postby Bob Greenhalgh » Tue Feb 26, 2008 11:59 am

Hi Whacker,
I think you're right-although we just used to call it 'Blakeos'. Just remembered-next door to that shop was Higham's the chemist -he had another shop by the Coronation on Linacre Lane. By the traffis lights at Linacre Lane was Mersey Cables and across from there, in Hawthorne Road, was Brown Bros Engineers. The first house in Provence Road used to sell Sunday papers and cigarettes-I think.
Merseyside Improved Houses bought the whole Klondyke estate 800 houses or thereabouts. The previous owners, who had bought it from Jones, got lumbered with rent controls and were severely restricted by how much and when they could impose rent increases. Seem to recall that they had carried out a lot of improvements to the houses-kitchen and bathroom extensions etc. I suppose they were anticipating clawing their money back through the rents -but couldn't.
Bob
:)
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Staley Street

Postby georgewiliam » Tue Feb 26, 2008 1:14 pm

Bob Greenhalgh---Most impressed with your memories of the personalities in and around the area of the street. I mentioned in an earlier post, the interestiing aspects of childhood ageism where small differences in age determined whether or not a person was 'in' or 'out' of a particular circle of chums. Also, that whilst older siblings were looked up to as being 'grown-up', younger siblings were a pain in the butt and had to be tolerated. Chum's younger brothers and sisters were not usually full members of any particular group----they formed their own. Why have I mentioned this ----- I only remember Gerry, Valery, Teddy and 'some more Greenhalghs'. Much the same with Georgie and Marjorie Barkley who are well remembered but when Jim came home after the war, he and Hilda had their own personal baby-boom none of whom loom large in my memory.
I remember your father very well as being a man of small stature with an easy-going manner and warm personality. He was very proud of his Pye wireless with it's magic-eye tuning. Fancy remembering the telephone number of the box at the top of the road----I think the next nearest public 'phone was part way down Hawthorne Rd on the opposite side to Irwins. You mention that a call cost 4d------I seem to remember it going from 2d to 3d at one point. You may not believe it but when we moved to Iver in 1970, the telephone exchange was still manual with a button A Button B phone outside the post office. I remember in the mid 70s, a chap stood outside the box in total puzzlement having to ask what it was all about.
Your recall of names is wonderful. I suspect that you may be recalling from the mid to late 50s as in my day Mr and Mrs Green lived at number 2--they moved to the Sterrix estate where I came across them in my paper-lad days. I thought that Jim Daley who lived at about #8 next to Derek Salisbury were the first to have tv---I remember not being impressed with Muffin the Mule. Derek's step dad used to be a conductor on the Ribble buses.
Clare Williams, I believe, was a war widow whose husband never saw his daughter Joyce. Joyce was always immaculately turned out---Clare did a good job. Tina Whiting and our next door neighbour, Mrs Edwards, often carried out verbal warfare addressing each other in all manner of expletives from their respective doorsteps. I had no idea what a hooer was until much older when I realised 'hooer' was being spoken in the vernacular. During these bouts, everybody kept their heads down but doors held slightly ajar so as not to miss anything.
Bob, perhaps you could drop me a pm for an update on the family
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Staley Street

Postby Bob Greenhalgh » Wed Feb 27, 2008 4:29 pm

Does anybody remember Mr Pratt (Lord Kitchener's double)and his horse driven veg cart with oil lamps hanging along the sides? Or the single decker bus that used to come around the streets with caged animals aboard? Or the old glazier on a bike? The Pratts lived in Glynne Street and had an extension in their back yard from where fresh veg was sold. Peggy Unsworth nee Pratt who lived on the corner of Monfa and Glynne was my Mam's friend. I used to knock about with her son Paul. He had 3 sisters. Beryl, Norma and Carol -I think!
Regards,
Bob
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Postby tine » Sat Mar 01, 2008 4:42 pm

Hi George & Bob
We were only talking about the Pratts the other day, and who was the lady a couple of doors away who used to make toffee apples like no-one else could? Mrs Birch in the chandlers and the smell of paraffin. Remember the little paraffin heaters....square shaped like a stand-alone fire with a dome in the middle....at the time they looked quite posh! Being the youngest, I was usually sent to collect the paraffin but never complained because I loved the smell in that shop. The walls were crammed full of things, and bucket and such dangling from the ceiling suspended by string. Heaven!!
Tine
Campbell, Duffy, Davies, Melia, Gibson , O'Donnell, Owen and Evans Families.
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Postby margaret willee » Sat Mar 01, 2008 8:22 pm

Thanks again Geargewiliam ... wish i could remember my childhood like you .
i do enjoy reading yours ... Margaret .
have a great day .......
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klondike area

Postby loko » Mon Mar 03, 2008 12:38 pm

hi/ been interesting reading about the klondike my wife was born and lived in 19 gynne st. untill 1968 when we married .she is always saying they had the best street partys ever.any photos around,would be nice to see them.walked around the area afew weeks ago like a ghost town now. .
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Staley St

Postby georgewiliam » Tue Mar 04, 2008 12:51 pm

Bob Greenhalgh, do you remember trotting over to the Ribble Garage to where the conductors handed over the shift takings with change to get a shilling for the gas. Ocassionaly, buses were parked right outside your house on Hawthorne Rd where we would empty the used ticket container to collect the 'white' tickets which could be sort of 'origamied' into an accordion. Possibly before your time, I remember three or more Foden steam lorries parked just up from your place. These trucks had horizontal boilers per steam rollers and looked really old fashioned not at all like the Sentinel steam lorries with their modern vertical boilers----God I'm getting old! I can't now remember which company, on Hawthorne, had the Sentinel lorry fleet. Looking at Google images of these vehicles really makes me feel my age.
Would like to compliment you again on your powers of recall---tremendous.
Tine---what about the hissing Tilley Lamp as a paraffin heater
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Mr Pratt

Postby maureenbrown » Sat Mar 08, 2008 2:04 am

I lived up Monfa Road/ Ainsdale Road, and Mr Pratt used to come up will his horse drawn cart, selling vegetables, and other things too. He really was a hardy character, flat hat, and of course, the moustache. Does any one remember the name of his horse.I think Mr Wild from Hanlon Avenue, took the round over after Mr Pratt and his horse retired.
Spensleys was where we went for our sweets.Were they two sisters who had it.Always had nice clean wrap round pinnies on.i had my ration book for my sweets, and a handfull of pennies, this would be about 1952/3
I went to Orrell School, and each week, we would take money in for stamps, because we were encouraged to save.I was the one sent to the postoffice to get all the stamps.
The chemist by the Coronation was not owned by Mr Higham, but Mr Massam.
On that block, was Dooleys shop,bread, ham,cakes,pies,biscuits and so on. The shop was always open Sundays, and always packed.I think the lady's name was Marie.Next was the Co-op where my mum did her weekly shop. I can still remember my mums divi number 113226......They used to have the overhead money carriers, which we all assosciate with the early co-op. Then we had the "Wine Stores". Then there was a butchers, but I dont remember the names any more. most important for any child, the sweet shop, where we would bye Reeces ice cream lollies, and Wessex fireworks.Boxes were 2/6 and 5 bob, and you got loads in them. bangers, roman fountains, mount vesuvius, depth chargers, snow drops, flood lights, golden rain,,rockets, pin wheels, and rip raps..theres loads ive forgotten.
Then there was the cobblers, a busy little shop, which had a smell all of its own...no it wasnt feet,but leather.
Then there was the barbers.. was it Swellwells, or something like that, then Mr Massams the chemist, where we would take our prescriptions.
My mum use to buy me white rain shampoo sachets, and a scented bath cubes, for bath nights.My dad used to send me there for his Gillette razor blades, which we used to take out of his razor, sharpen our pencils, and put the razor blade back.My dad liked the extra strong mints, which were kept in apothacaries jars behind the counter.Lastly on the block was the chippy, and at the front of the shop was a big sloping fish slab. Ive forgotten a lot of the names, :roll: but they are still there, buried in my brain, and they will come to me. :idea: When they do, ill let you know, unless some one else can fill in the gaps. I lived in that area from 1950 untill 1968.
Coffeypot
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Postby frank delamere » Sat Mar 08, 2008 9:50 pm

great memories COFFEEPOT. and original monicker also
frank
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Postby Bob Greenhalgh » Mon Mar 10, 2008 5:34 pm

Your right Maureen it was Massam's not Higham's. You have a good memory.
Sorry.
:)
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Postby Bob Greenhalgh » Mon Mar 10, 2008 5:35 pm

I didn't mean sorry that you have a good memory! Got things in the wrong order.
LOL
:oops:
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Postby tine » Mon Mar 10, 2008 6:53 pm

Hi Georgewilliam

Our hissing Tilly lamp was reverently taken to the outside loo in the dark and hung on an obliging nail :)
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Staley St

Postby georgewiliam » Wed Mar 12, 2008 3:48 pm

Outside loo------having a fairly vivid imagination, I used to terrorise my brother and sister in our bedroom with tales of gorillas and other things under the bed that I shared with the brov. Other things were lizard hands or skeletal arms all poised to grab you if you you put a foot out of bed. Much to my delight, these tales really got my brother going but it had obviously been taken too far when he would not go to the outside lavvy in the darkness of Winter. Mum and Dad on finding out what I had been up to became concerned that darkness induced constipation would do him no good at all. From then on, I had to sit on the dustbin with the headlamp off Dad's bike to illuminate his endeavours. Perched on the bin in the middle of Winter keeping brother company was no fun whatsoever. Needless to say, I stopped making up stories.
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Postby frank delamere » Wed Mar 12, 2008 8:18 pm

GEORGE, one lesson HARDY EARNED
frank
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Postby warbaby » Fri Mar 21, 2008 12:05 pm

Testing,

Margery Webster (nee Barkley) wishing to contribute to this forum. I have had problems posting this is just a test message.

Margery Webster (nee Barkley)
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Postby warbaby » Fri Mar 21, 2008 12:35 pm

Looks like I am home and hosed!! However, given that I have wasted a great deal of time writing a virtual tome which was lost in the ether in getting to this stage, I will serialise my contibution!

At the outset I would like to say how much I have enjoyed all of your contributions so far. Georgewilliam I really enjoyed the photos of your Mum as I well remember her and her family, including you as my brother's friend. Peggy Savage (#13) gave me a ball of wool and taught me how to knit. Your mother saw me sitting on the step at my place (#19) engrossed in my effort at knitting and invited me up to your house where she produced a brown paper carrier bag full of wool oddments depicting every colour under the sun. This gift may well have been the crown jewels from my perspective and sparked a life time interest in knitting which is still appreciated by me and my family to this day.

Will contribute more when I know it is getting through!!

Warbaby!!
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Postby warbaby » Mon Mar 24, 2008 10:05 pm

Jim and Hilda Barkley had five more children after George and me (the two mentioned by georgewilliam). Beryl, Bill and Susan were born in #19. In 1955 we moved to a big old house (now demolished) in Gorsey Lane, Ford (near Cookson's Bridge) where Pam and Jim were born - well they were actually born in Oxford Street Maternity Hospital, the rest of us were born in the front bedroom at #19. I can distinctly remember my father carrying buckets of hot water up and down the stairs the night that Susan was born. Nurse Hoy and Nurse Thrash were the two local midwives who delivered most of the babies in the district.

Sadly my brother George died in 1980 from lung cancer, probably caused by a combination of breathing in the polluted air from the noxious factories in his childhood, heavy smoking and his occupation as a painter and decorator, my father died of the same condition 20 years earlier.

I married Bill Webster from Humphrey Street in 1957. My father refused permission so because I was under 21 I went to Bootle magistrates court where the Magistrate (Alderman Simon Mahon) declared this is "a genuine love match". I still have the newspaper cuttings reporting the case and the written decision which cost me 7 shillings, it describes me as "an infant desirous of contracting a marriage"!! Bill and I, followed in our familys' footsteps by having five children of our own and happily celebrated our 50th wedding anniversary last year.

As I remember it, Mary, Eleanor, Marion, Annie and Menai were the 'posh' streets mentioned by georgewilliam. They had the small front gardens and bathrooms (like those on Monfa Rd). In these streets the metal railings had been removed from the low front walls of the houses to be used in the war effort.

Who remembers dried egg powder, Spam and grey bread? And visiting the clinic in Knowsley Road to pick up concentrated orange juice, cod liver oil (ugh) and malt and national dried milk for the babies? Coccoa powder, sent from Canada arrived at Orrell School after the war had finished - we were invited to take a cup to receive our share.

I remember celebrating Empire Day at Orrell school, when we were all asked to come dressed in costumes to represent all the countries of the Empire.

Does anyone remember taking a sack in a billy cart or an old pram to the gas works in Marsh Lane and queuing up to buy coke when coal was in short supply in the winter?

Any history of the Street would not be complete without mention of "Jigger Mike" the local cop who did his rounds on a Raleigh Roadster, symbolising law and order to some and a nightmare to tear-a-ways like my husband Bill and his family.

White's the Grocer was also the post office including the payment of family allowance and pensions. Sometimes Mr. White would allow credit on a Monday on the promise of being repaid on Tuesday (family allowance day). However he would first cross off the list any "luxuries" such as biscuits or sweets, which had been added in order to bribe kids to do the messages!! Old Mrs. Monks, short in stature, was the kindly shop assistant in the grocery section. I used to watch fascinated as she cut and patted the butter into 8 ounce blocks, shaping them by dipping the wooden paddles into cold water every now and then. Murial, a very pleasant woman served in the post office.

I think there was a shop called Liggetts on the corner of Willard Street, the butchers next door was Thelwell's and the chandlers on the same block was run by Mr. Blane (Blain?), he had a problem with his eyes and his daughter helped him in the shop.

Lillian Farnsworth, her daughter (also Lillian) and son David lived in # 18. Lillian was my age. Their father did not return from the war and never saw his son. Old Mrs. Farnsworth lived in #22 and Mrs Bird and her daughter Elsie in 24. I can remember my Mum speaking about a Mabel King, but the Rosetti's lived in 28 in my time in the Street.

In #21 lived Alice Stewart with her father. Alice was my god mother and Eric and Leslie Whiting's Aunt. I visited Alice in 1997, she was in her 90's, frail and nearly blind. I only vaguely remember the Miss Llewellen previously mentioned in the Forum, I think Ethel and Eddie Iddon who were somehow related to the Roach's moved into that house. They were the first in the Street to make their front door flush by covering the four panels with hardboard!!

Cheers!

Warbaby
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Staley Street

Postby georgewiliam » Tue Mar 25, 2008 1:27 pm

Warbaby----why is it that the ex-inhabitants of the street have such powerful and evocative memories. I am in no doubt that Staley Streey was a little bit special. Marjorie, your memories are spot-on. After the house in what was then open country in Gorsey Lane, you moved to the region of Marina Avenue. I remember visiting with my Mum and you turned up----it was quite a surprise to find that you were married, this must have been in the early 60's. By the way, I am not too sure that the houses on Gorsey Lane were demolished as they can be clearly seen on Google Earth but that may be as a result of site redevelopment.
Sorry to hear about George, he wasn't dealt the best hand of cards for life's living. Mum told me that when your Dad died, he was on the verge of making his fortune as a developer in Maghull.
Bill, your husband, I am sure, is the guy who felt that I was an easy touch when Mum threatened to set me onto him for his giving my brother grief---not wrong, he could handle himself.
Yes, foodstuffs of the time are well remembered as well as visits to the gasworks for the coke.which was amazing stuff---rock hard with a silvery-lead sheen.
Ligetts? did it not become Irwins, I remember the name but I do not clearly remember where it was
Alice Stewart was well into either the Salvation Army or the Boy's Brigade and I remember her well as a fussy be-spectacled lady with a sharpish tongue.
The young couple who took over Miss Llewellyn's nouse, we understood, actually bought it for the huge sum of £100-----how times have changed. Rosetti's------was this Billy Rosetti married to Margaret Edwards from 33, if so Margaret was widowed at an early age. I think that Billy was born somewhere near 'The Saltbox' pub in Litherland
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Postby warbaby » Wed Mar 26, 2008 6:17 am

Isn't Google Earth amazing?!! Yes the Gorsey Lane site was redeveloped (I believe there is a doctors surgery there now). Our semi-detached house, called "Newlands" was built on quite a large block, the adjoining house was a dairy (distribution only). These houses had five bedrooms and were very similar to the old houses in Merton Road. Another pair of houses in the same row were of a different vintage and still standing when I visited a few years ago. My Mum, like many who moved away, always missed Staley Street and it's neighbours. She would have been delighted to have the visit from your mother in the 60's. Mum died in 1984.
I think it was most likely Bill's brother George who your Mum would threaten to set you onto (God help you!!). Twelve months to the day, younger than Bill, George was always up for a fight - Bill, the elder of the two, used to threaten anyone who had a go at him with a serve from George and that resolved the situation!! The Webster's had lived in Middlesex for a number of years and returned to Bootle to be near family when their father died. You can imagine that there was much mocking of their southern accents at Orrell Primary School and a bit of bullying went on too. Bill went into his shell and was the quiet one, George responded with his fists. He returned to the south as an adult, where he lives with his lovely wife Rose.
Bill attended Bootle Grammar school from 1948 and, like others on the Forum, hated every minute of it. He spent much happier times regularly attending the Air Training Corps in Crosby and eventually joined the RAF as a Halton Apprentice in 1953. I attended Roberts Secondary Modern. My memory of the curriculum - how to starch and iron a tray cloth, scrub a wooden draining board, make a rhubarb pie, draw up a family budget and sing "Where the Bee Sucks there Suck I" while trying to keep a straight face!! (apologies to Miss Richardson the very glamorous, red haired music teacher). On leaving school I worked at the Merton Grove Company (Tate & Lyle) as a telephonist/relief typist and they paid for me to attend night classes at Gregg College in Rodney Street to learn shorthand typing.
Liggets was not highly regarded by the local housewives. There was another Liggets shop at the top of Hawthorne Road, near Vernons, also a Ross's Green Grocer, and a sweet shop run by a guy called Bert (who looked like George Formby!). That block of shops is not as clear in my memory as 'our' shops, like Harris Drive, it was considered to be miles away and too far to carry the shopping!! Everything seemed so much smaller and closer on recent visits.
I visited Orrell School in 1997. One of the teachers showed me around and explained that an indoor garden, built on a low table like structure in the hall, was in rememberance of a little girl who had recently been murdered on the canal bank by a fellow student. Several attempts at establishing an outside garden were destroyed by vandals. How sad.
I remember Bill Rosetti, Margaret Edwards husband. I don't know if they were related but the Rosetti family I am thinking of lived in #28, they had a boy called (?) Stephan and a young girl. Their mother's name was Dolly, my Mum used to call her Dolly Wooley (I think that may have been her maiden name). Dolly had very thin legs and had difficulty in walking, I believe due to a childhood illness. May Seddon lived in that vicinity too. Luptons with kids Rita and Edward lived in #3 and an old woman called Maggie Ramsay occupied #7 or 9. I think Mrs. Varey was in #15 and Hughie and Edna (nee Palin) Jones and two daughters next to us in 17.
Alice Stewart (#21) was a sunday school teacher at St. John & St. James Church and did run the Boy's Brigade. You're right about the sharp tongue, she was a devout Anglican Christian and expected no less of others!!
Your memory of the house being sold for 100 GBP jogged my memory. I think that was the first privately owned house in the Street!!
Mrs. Beaumont, who lived with her daughter Murial, in the Ribble owned house with the front door in our street, made her own bread and often asked me to go to Whites for fresh yeast, or "balm" as she called it. I think she was from Yorkshire. She sometimes let my Mum use her phone too, as Bob Greenhalgh points out it was the only private phone in the Street!!

Cheers for now

Margery
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staley street

Postby georgewiliam » Thu Jun 12, 2008 5:57 pm

Bobhamo
You were kind enough to email me a copy of the street residents after the war------any chance of offering it as a post. A lot of the old inhabitants have good memories of the various personalities----it would be nice to fill in any 'holes'
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Staley Street

Postby warbaby » Wed Aug 27, 2008 1:45 pm

Just returned from a visit to Bootle. How sad to see all the houses boarded up in the Street (and adjoining 'Klondyke' streets too). Notices on the doors announce that anything of value has been removed. We probably would not want people to now live in the very basic conditions we experienced during those times, witness the number of ex resident contributors to this forum who have relocated to all corners of the globe! However, as Georgewilliam and other contributors have so graphically described, there was a supportive network which sustained us through many tough times including war time, the TB plague, coal shortages etc., while still remembering celebratory occasions such as the Festival of Britain, the Coronation and VE and VJ days. Do any of you remember those winters when we stood outside the gas works in Marsh Lane for hours on end to collect coke in a sack or two transported in an old pram? My reward for this chore was a hot drink made from an OXO cube!

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Postby the top of audely street » Thu Aug 28, 2008 6:28 pm

the dairy in humprey street has today i believe closed its doors for the final time to await demolition.
staley street and the dairy side if humprey street i am told will be the first demolished.
the langton dock goods yard
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Postby warbaby » Fri Aug 29, 2008 12:45 pm

Thanks "top of Audley Street" for this info. I regularly visited that dairy as a small girl. First it was Hanson's who subsequently sold out to Reece's. They employed a lovely couple called Renee and Fred to manage the dairy. In Hanson's time I used to take a jug up to THE dairy for our daily milk. Mum gave me a protective cloth cover with beads to keep it weighted down and strict instructions to make sure I covered the jug with it for the short journey home! I remember THE dairy having the first icy poles (red and green) what a delight!! I was considered a "good little messenger" visiting White's the grocer and asking for credit until family allowance day (Mr.White always crossed biscuits, jam or sweets off the list!) and purchasing the spitfires and chips on the rare times we could afford them. I am ashamed to admit that I usually stooped in the nearest shop doorway on the way home, opened the packet on my knee and ate a few chips!! One of the perks of being the family messenger - the other was purchasing the bread from Scott's and picking some choice bits off the crust on the way home!!

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Re: Mr Pratt

Postby Pauline Darwin » Fri Aug 29, 2008 1:50 pm

maureenbrown wrote:I lived up Monfa Road/ Ainsdale Road, and Mr Pratt used to come up will his horse drawn cart, selling vegetables, and other things too. He really was a hardy character, flat hat, and of course, the moustache. Does any one remember the name of his horse.I think Mr Wild from Hanlon Avenue, took the round over after Mr Pratt and his horse retired.
Spensleys was where we went for our sweets.Were they two sisters who had it.Always had nice clean wrap round pinnies on.i had my ration book for my sweets, and a handfull of pennies, this would be about 1952/3
I went to Orrell School, and each week, we would take money in for stamps, because we were encouraged to save.I was the one sent to the postoffice to get all the stamps.
The chemist by the Coronation was not owned by Mr Higham, but Mr Massam.
On that block, was Dooleys shop,bread, ham,cakes,pies,biscuits and so on. The shop was always open Sundays, and always packed.I think the lady's name was Marie.Next was the Co-op where my mum did her weekly shop. I can still remember my mums divi number 113226......They used to have the overhead money carriers, which we all assosciate with the early co-op. Then we had the "Wine Stores". Then there was a butchers, but I dont remember the names any more. most important for any child, the sweet shop, where we would bye Reeces ice cream lollies, and Wessex fireworks.Boxes were 2/6 and 5 bob, and you got loads in them. bangers, roman fountains, mount vesuvius, depth chargers, snow drops, flood lights, golden rain,,rockets, pin wheels, and rip raps..theres loads ive forgotten.
Then there was the cobblers, a busy little shop, which had a smell all of its own...no it wasnt feet,but leather.
Then there was the barbers.. was it Swellwells, or something like that, then Mr Massams the chemist, where we would take our prescriptions.
My mum use to buy me white rain shampoo sachets, and a scented bath cubes, for bath nights.My dad used to send me there for his Gillette razor blades, which we used to take out of his razor, sharpen our pencils, and put the razor blade back.My dad liked the extra strong mints, which were kept in apothacaries jars behind the counter.Lastly on the block was the chippy, and at the front of the shop was a big sloping fish slab. Ive forgotten a lot of the names, :roll: but they are still there, buried in my brain, and they will come to me. :idea: When they do, ill let you know, unless some one else can fill in the gaps. I lived in that area from 1950 untill 1968.


Hi Message body

I only joined recently and am amazed at what I am reading - fantastic.

My name is Pauline Darwin nee Green and Mr Jimmy Pratt was my Great Uncle . His last horse was called Susan. He lived in with his wife _ Auntie Lizzie who was Little Auntie to my Dad Tom Green - he had 2 Aunt Lizzies - the other one was Big Auntie!

If I am not mistaken the lady who did the toffee apples may have been this Auntie - Lizzie Harris or Lizzie Harrison.

Uncle Jimmy died when he was I think 93 and was given a Military funeral
in Bootle cemetery. His coffin was draped with the Union Flag and a high ranking officer from the regiment he served with in WW1 led a salute at the graveside. Uncle Jimmy was in a Highland regiment and I remember a picture of him over the fireplace in the back room with him in his tartan trousers.

My cousins the Greens lived in 56 Staley Street - Flo (rip) John, Jim(rip),Bill,Bob and Alan, their Mum & Dad were Agnes & John Green and their Uncle Charlie Green also lived with them. Uncle John served in the tank regiment in WW2 and often led the Bootle May Day procession in his tank.

If any one remembers them please let me know

Once again - what a fantastic site. I am in work at the moment doing this shh. Once I am on it I keep finding things that I remember . I was born in 1947 and do remember a lot of things from when I was very small

Keep up the good work

Pauline
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Postby frank delamere » Fri Aug 29, 2008 6:50 pm

hi PAULINE, glad to see, that you are enjoying the site, it can be quite interesting at times. enjoy it

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Re: Staley Street

Postby Pamsy » Sun Aug 31, 2008 4:57 pm

[quote="georgewiliam"]Liverpoollady---- Sadly, we moved up to Sterrix Lane in 1952/3, and I am sorry to say that I don't remember your family
I managed to make a pilgrimage to the old place last year--staying with my Sister Viv (the last ime I tried it was 3 years ago and I finished up in Aintree Hospital for my efforts). Viv and I had our foto taken outside 31 for old time's sake.

Hi George, did you know a KEEGAN family that lived on Sterrix Lane?
Pam in Indiana USA
Keegan, Carruthers, Rigg, Copland, Lobb, Hough, Mee
born in Bootle later lived in Netherton
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Staley St

Postby georgewiliam » Mon Sep 08, 2008 5:11 pm

Hi Pamsy----sorry can't help with Keegan---checked with sister Viv and she too is unable to help. It could simply be that we lived at the Stand Park end----only remember Pat Tole who lived t'other side of Sterrix Ave.
Pauline Darwin----when I opened the Staley St thread, I mentioned Jim and John Green. John was the elder but Jimmy was in our age group and as such we all trooped around together. I well remember their Dad and when he came home from the war. I believe he was in the 40th Tank Regiment who had a rough old time in North Africa.
Some years ago when I used to travel on business to Cairo, I picked up a book from the airport bookshop which had been written by a German soldier telling his experiences in the North African campaign. It was an absolute revelation as he described the action with the 40th Tank. In Bootle, we all knew that the 40th had taken a real towsing but in the spirit of the times, heavy casualties were largely accepted and not many questions were asked------you would be lucky to get a reply anyway
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Postby warbaby » Thu Sep 25, 2008 12:14 pm

I also remember the Greens from Staley Street. Jim was a friend of my brother George. I remember their Uncle Charlie too and Flo who cared for the family after their mother died. How interesting to revisit these memories! I did not know the Greens were related to the Pratts. I remember shopping for green groceries at Mr Pratts 'retail outlet' at the rear of their house in the back entry of Glynn Street - I thoought that was where I bought toffee apples??? Wherever, I can still see the toffee apples turned upside down on the tray!!

I attended Orrell school with Brenda Unsworth (Mr. Pratts's grand daughter), I heard that she eventually married and moved a bit further south - ? Stoke on Trent or somewhere in that region.
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Postby garthur » Sun Oct 12, 2008 1:15 am

Haven't been on forum for ages but clicked on tonight after talking to Oz uncle, Pete. Both of us realised it had been ages since we'd read the postings!

I was amazed to read all the info from GeorgeWilliam about Staley Street and surrounding area. And then, after reading a post from War Baby who mentioned Lily Farnworth from 18 Staley Street, I got the urge to add a few personal bits (oo-er, Matron!). Mrs Farnworth is still very much alive and kicking! She's 95 or 96 and has moved to Clayton-Le-Woods to be near her daughter Lilian. My sister, Sylvia (nee Jones) is married to David Farnworth!

Our own Mum, Elsie Jones (nee Lyons) was brought up in Humphrey Street. They later moved to Thornton Ave. I remember the shops on Monfa Road being called "the bottom" and the shops on Orrell Lane being called "the top" (now that's original!!)

Have to ask, was the Cousins referred to earlier in the postings, Billy Cousins?

My dad, William Jones, was a bricklayer - worked for the corporation.

Aah, memories.... Oh, and I went to school with Colette Pratt. And I remember there being a family of Greenhalgh in Mount Avenue...was it the same family as the Monfa Road one?

Glenys
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Postby lily8 » Sun Oct 12, 2008 6:07 am

Where is Georgewilliam ??????
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staley st

Postby georgewiliam » Sun Oct 12, 2008 6:10 pm

Liky----thanks for asking after me. In truth, I fell off my perch recently and it has taken some considerable time to clamber back up. I am still a little wobbly but getting there so stand by for more reminiscences----I will get to it soon.
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